Dear blogger friends

I was deeply touched and fortunate to have come across a very inspiring story from https://truthbook.com/stories/service/praying-hands-painting

                                                                     The Praying Hands

Hands

 

Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen!

In order merely to keep food on the table for this mob, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighborhood.

Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of the elder children, Albrecht and Albert, had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by laboring in the mines.

They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg.

Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht’s etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht’s triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honored position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfill his ambition. His closing words were, “And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you.”

All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, “No… no… no… no.”

Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, “No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look… Look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother… for me it is too late.”

More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer’s hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver-point sketches, water colors, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer’s works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother’s abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply “Hands,” but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love “The Praying Hands.” The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, that no one – no one – ever makes it alone!

Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen!

In order merely to keep food on the table for this mob, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighborhood.

Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of the elder children, Albrecht and Albert, had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by laboring in the mines.

They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg.

Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht’s etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht’s triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honored position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfill his ambition. His closing words were, “And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you.”

All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, “No… no… no… no.”

Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, “No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look… Look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother… for me it is too late.”

More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer’s hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver-point sketches, water colors, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer’s works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother’s abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply “Hands,” but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love “The Praying Hands.” The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, that no one – no one – ever makes it alone!

So my dear friends au revoir and be very well!

About dilipnaidu

An open mind! Love to share my thoughts and a keenness to learn. An engineer and a MBA I had a wonderful innings in the Army and later moved to consultancy and teaching. My current interests are music and growing culinary herbs. Love to play golf and do yoga regularly. I am serious on "Living life less seriously". A warm welcome to you be well and be cheerful always.

22 responses »

  1. I have seen this beautiful drawing before.
    Now that I know the story behind it, the drawing is even more impressive.
    Thank you!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. namitasunder says:

    What a powerful, beautiful story of sacrifice and love. And so apt to our present times. We, safe in our homes need to fold our hands in prayers cause we cant make through it if not for our those tireless saviors, workers….health workers, police, and so on….list is long. With heart full of gratitude.
    namita

    Liked by 3 people

    • dilipnaidu says:

      Thank you Namita and what you say is so true. Yes indeed the medical fraternity and all the those involved directly in operational duties such as water, electrical supply, society security in fact there are many many more whom we took for granted in normal times need to be respected and helped by us in any which way. If not anything the least we can do is follow the guidelines and protect ourselves and others.

      To end on a peaceful note in the words of Dada Vaswani ~
      “At the end of every tunnel there is light, At the end of a dark night there is a beautiful dawn”!

      Kind regards,
      Dilip

      Liked by 1 person

  3. A powerful story of love and sacrifice. Thanks for posting it, Dilip. –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

  4. A powerful and beautiful story, my dear Dilip and I adore that painting!
    I wonder why FB won’t let me share it! Unbelievable, but I got the following message: “Your message couldn’t be sent because it includes content that other people on Facebook have reported as abusive.” – honestly what is this world coming to?!!!!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Binky says:

    Dilip, just wanted to let you know that your link address from your avatar doesn’t properly direct to your blog. Possibly because it is http instead of https.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Binky says:

    That is a great story. Too often people claim they made it all on their own, and of course that is never true. We sometimes don’t realize all the things that happened for us to end up where we are, but all of us stand on the accomplishments of countless souls from the past.

    Liked by 2 people

    • dilipnaidu says:

      That’s absolutely true. We forget the people who helped us succeed which is a big mistake some leaders do. But such successes are rather short lived.
      Thanks for your comment Binky 🙂

      Like

  7. Such a heartwarming story of a brothers sacrifice to enable the progression of the other… I have seen the image of this painting many times over the years Dilip, and never knew the background story..
    What an inspiring story it is..
    Many thanks for sharing it with us my friend.. A reminder to us all..
    Sending thoughts your way and well wishes..
    💚🙏

    Liked by 3 people

    • dilipnaidu says:

      It’s always so wonderful to hear from you dear Sue. I just could not resist sharing a story such as this one with my blogger friends. And I am truly delighted that you a blogger I so respect liked and appreciated the story behind ‘Praying Hands’!

      I look forward to resume blogging regularly and also visiting your blog.
      Sending you many good wishes 💐
      Dilip

      Liked by 1 person

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