The Praying Hands

Dear blogger friends

I was deeply touched and fortunate to have come across a very inspiring story from https://truthbook.com/stories/service/praying-hands-painting

                                                                     The Praying Hands

Hands

 

Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen!

In order merely to keep food on the table for this mob, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighborhood.

Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of the elder children, Albrecht and Albert, had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by laboring in the mines.

They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg.

Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht’s etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht’s triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honored position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfill his ambition. His closing words were, “And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you.”

All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, “No… no… no… no.”

Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, “No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look… Look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother… for me it is too late.”

More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer’s hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver-point sketches, water colors, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer’s works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother’s abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply “Hands,” but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love “The Praying Hands.” The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, that no one – no one – ever makes it alone!

Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen!

In order merely to keep food on the table for this mob, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighborhood.

Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of the elder children, Albrecht and Albert, had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by laboring in the mines.

They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg.

Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht’s etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht’s triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honored position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfill his ambition. His closing words were, “And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you.”

All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, “No… no… no… no.”

Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, “No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look… Look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother… for me it is too late.”

More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer’s hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver-point sketches, water colors, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer’s works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother’s abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply “Hands,” but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love “The Praying Hands.” The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, that no one – no one – ever makes it alone!

So my dear friends au revoir and be very well!

Happy New Year 2020

My dear blogger friends have a wonderful 2020 and may you and your families be blessed with the best of health and happiness. Let’s also resolve to make a difference and bring smiles in the lives of the less fortunate folk.

Cheers 🥂 🎊

An Empty Boat

Hi my dear blogger friends it feels great to blog again after a long hiatus. I could not resist sharing this beautiful story with you and do hope you enjoy it.
A monk decides to meditate alone, away from his monastery.
He takes his boat out to the middle of the lake, moors it there, closes his eyes and begins his meditation.
After a few hours of undisturbed silence, he suddenly feels the bump of another boat colliding with his own.
With his eyes still closed, he senses his anger rising, and by the time he opens his eyes, he is ready to scream at the boatman who dared disturb his meditation.
But when he opens his eyes, he sees it’s an empty boat that had probably got untethered and floated to the middle of the lake.
At that moment, the monk achieves self-realization, and understands that the anger is within him; it merely needs the bump of an external object to provoke it out of him.
From then on, whenever he comes across someone who irritates him or provokes him to anger, he reminds himself, “The other person is merely an empty boat. The anger is within me.”
Take time for introspection & search for answer:
“Empty boat” is a famous & fabulous metaphor. Its value lies in its implementation.
So lets continue our journey within be aware, be mindful, be joyful and savor the wonders around us.

The present moment

Many of us do feel that moments of happiness in our lives are few and fleeting. The words in the quote below reveal the reason why.

Our mind is constantly taking us away from the present moment either into the past or in the future. As such we miss the happiness which exists in the present moment. The only way to be happy is to do things mindfully and be aware of the beauty of our surrounding. Enjoy nature’s bounty and develop the art of listening. Such like simple practices will surely make us experience happiness and plenty of it.

Cheers and regards to you my friends 🙂 🙂

Dilip

Wishing You a Very Happy New Year 2019

To all my dear friends of many years as we step into the New Year, may your fears fade away, your strength be renewed and your dreams come true!

My wishes for you and yours to remain happy and joyful in all phases of your life. Have a wonderful New Year 2019 💐 🎉

Kind regards

Dilip

 

 

A helping hand

I felt like sharing the cute image above as it says so much 🙂

“Extending one hand to help somebody has more value than joining two hands for prayer”!

Helping and caring for others in their difficult times is a deeply fulfilling act. It beautifies our soul and defines the very purpose of our existence. I guess that’s what life is all about!

Have a wonderful week dear friends 🙂

Awareness

Why do our open eyes not see? Is it because our mind is kept constantly preoccupied with unwanted thoughts?

Only when we learn to quieten our mind will our eyes begin to really see the beautiful treasures around us. Lets make the most of this and live our life full awareness.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2018

My dear friends 

               The gift of love,

               The gift of peace,

               The gift of happiness,

               May all these be yours 

                               DILIP  

Keeping an open mind

We grow up wanting to acquire more and more information and knowledge. Knowledge does enable us to gain high status, power and respect from society. But if we do not handle our success and power with due humility we soon get blinded by our ego. It is therefore important to achieve a balance between the heavy load of knowledge with a light mind.

Acquiring knowledge is tough but letting go of it is even more challenging. Lightening our minds is possible if we are prepared to surrender our ego of knowledge. And one of the way is to remove the clutter and calm our mind. Only then can we understand issues and problems with an open mind and by listening to our inner voice.

Please do share your views with our readers and visitors.

Thank you and have a great weekend. 

Listen to silence

 

The story below in a simple way illustrates Rumi’s wisdom and the magic of silence:

“There once was a farmer who discovered that he had lost his watch in the barn. It was no ordinary watch because it had sentimental value for him.

After searching high and low among the hay for a long while; he gave up and enlisted the help of a group of children playing outside the barn.

He promised them that the person who found it would be rewarded.

Hearing this, the children hurried inside the barn, went through and around the entire stack of hay but still could not find the watch. Just when the farmer was about to give up looking for his watch, a little boy went up to him and asked to be given another chance.

The farmer looked at him and thought, “Why not? After all, this kid looks sincere enough.”

So the farmer sent the little boy back in the barn. After a while the little boy came out with the watch in his hand! The farmer was both happy and surprised and so he asked the boy how he succeeded where the rest had failed. 

The boy replied, “I did nothing but sit on the ground and listen. In the silence, I heard the ticking of the watch and just looked for it in that direction.”

The story proves that creative thoughts and problem solving solutions emerge only when the mind is calm and uncluttered. Even neuroscience has proven that silence nourishes the mind and body. Its a good to practice to sit in silence for at least 10 minutes once or twice a day. Soon the mind when faced with a situation will learn to auto-connect with our inner silence and think with clarity to find a solution.

Cheers and best wishes to all my friends! 🙂